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Grey Global

Grey Global

Grey Group is a global advertising and marketing agency, with headquarters in New York City, and 432 offices in 96 countries, operating in 154 cities — organized into four geographical units: North America; Europe, Middle East & Africa, Asia-Pacific and Latin America.

As a unit of communications conglomerate WPP Group, Grey Global Group operates branded independent business units in many communications disciplines including: advertising, direct marketing, public relations, public affairs, brand development, customer relationship management, sales promotion, interactive marketing — through its subsidiaries: Grey, G2, GHG, GCI Group, MediaCom Worldwide, Alliance, G WHIZ, and WINGLATINO.

Grey Group’s international clients include: Procter & Gamble, GlaxoSmithKline, Nokia, BAT, Diageo, Volkswagen, Novartis, Wyeth, Canon and 3M.

The company has won: 10 Cannes Lions; beside the Addy, Clio and one Emmy Award. Grey Group's European network, Grey EMEA, won 26 Euro EFFIE awards, and is the four-time Euro EFFIE Agency Network of the Year, in four consecutive years of 2005–2008.

History

Founded in 1917 (1917) by Larry Valenstein and Arthur Fatt, Grey Global Group began as a direct marketing company named Grey Studios, reflecting the color of the wall of its original quarters, changing to Grey Advertising in 1925.

In 1956 (1956), Grey acquired its first major client, Procter & Gamble. Through the 1960s and 1970s, Grey continued to acquire such major accounts, and grew into related communication fields. In 1970 (1970), Edward H. Meyer became CEO and would remain in that position for 36 years before selling the company and joining his son, Anthony E. Meyer, in management of private family wealth.

In 1988 (1988), the off-shore operation, London-based Grey Communications Group, recruited Barry Chapman as Group IS Director. In 1989 (1989) Chapman developed the New Media Experiment. Chapman explored the use of the internet as an alternative to traditional advertising media putting Grey at the forefront of the internet revolution.

In 2000 (2000), Grey Advertising became Grey Global Group. On March 7, 2005 (2005-03-07), WPP Group beat out Havas in a race to acquire Grey Global, the seventh-largest advertising agency at the time, for approximately 1.3 billion USD.

In late 2005, James R. Heekin III became CEO of Grey Worldwide, Grey Global Group's traditional advertising agency. On January 1, 2007 (2007-01-01), he became Chairman and CEO of Grey Group, the renamed agency holding company. He reports to Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP Group.

Grey Group, Grey Advertising New York and G2 moved to a LEEDS certified building at 200 5th Avenue in New York in November 2009, after 45 years at their previous location."Grey Global Moves Into LEED-CS-Hopeful Toy Building at 200 Fifth Avenue". gbnyc. 2009-11-02. http://www.greenbuildingsnyc.com/blog/stephendp/grey-global-moves-into-leed-cs-hopeful-toy-building-at-200-fifth-avenue. Retrieved 2009-11-02.

Awards

In 2010, Grey was named to Fast Company's 50 Most Innovative Companies. In 2010, Grey was put on Ad Age's "Agency A-List". In 2006, Grey was awarded 12 "Spots of the Week" by Advertising Age, which placed it second-highest overall.

In popular culture

In the AMC series Mad Men, Duck Phillips joins Grey Advertising after being dumped by Sterling-Cooper.

In episode three of the 2010 series of BBC Three's Young, Dumb and Living Off Mum, the young adults spend a day at Grey Advertising working on a mock sexual health campaign.

Bridgestone

Bridgestone

Bridgestone Corporation is a multinational rubber conglomerate founded in 1931 by Shojiro Ishibashi  in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan. The name Bridgestone comes from a calque translation and transposition of ishibashi, meaning "stone bridge" in Japanese.

As of the end of 2005, production facilities belonging to the Bridgestone Group have increased to 141 spread throughout twenty-four nations of the world. In order to attain this level of globalization, the company established a new set of corporate policies in the year 2001. In continuation of this, the company's Brand Vision was also established in 2003.

History

Origins

The very first Bridgestone tire was produced on April 9, 1930, by the Japanese "Tabi" Socks tire Division (actually made jika-tabi). One year later on March 1, 1931, the founder, Shojiro Ishibashi, made the "Tabi" Socks tire Division independent and established the Bridgestone Tire Co., Ltd. in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka Prefecture. "Bridgestone" was named after the name of the founder, Shojiro Ishibashi (Ishi = Stone, Bashi = Bridge).

Foregoing dependence on European and North America technology, the Bridgestone Tire Co., Ltd. set its eyes on manufacturing tires based solely on Japanese technology. The foundling company experienced many difficulties in the areas of technology, production and sales in the early days. Eventually, improvements were achieved in quality and manufacturing processes which led to the business rapidly expanding on both the domestic and overseas markets.

Technological innovation

In 1951, Bridgestone was the first company in Japan to begin selling rayon cord tires, and a five-year project to modernize production facilities was started. This year also saw another Bridgestone building opened in Kyōbashi, Tokyo, which contained the Bridgestone Museum. Sales surpassed ten billion yen in 1953, placing Bridgestone at the top of the tire industry in Japan, and celebrations were held to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the company's foundation in Kurume.

The sale of nylon tires was started in 1959, and work forged ahead with the construction of the new Tokyo plant, which was opened in 1960, in order to cope with the fast-expanding market for motorization.