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Saatchi & Saatchi

Saatchi & Saatchi

Saatchi & Saatchi is a global advertising agency network with 140 offices in 80 countries and over 6,500 staff. It was founded in London in 1970 but now headquartered in New York. The parent company of the agency group was known as Saatchi & Saatchi PLC from 1976 to 1994, was listed on the London Stock Exchange until 2000 and for a time, was a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index. In 2000, the group was acquired by the Publicis Groupe.

History

Early years

Saatchi & Saatchi was founded by brothers Maurice (now Lord Saatchi) and art collector Charles in 1970. Following stints starting as a copywriter at the London offices of Benton & Bowles in 1965, then at Collett Dickenson Pearce and John Collins & Partners, Charles Saatchi teamed up with Art director Ross Cramer and the genesis of what would become Saatchi & Saatchi was born in London in 1967 as the creative consultancy CramerSaatchi. The consultancy took on employees John Hegarty and Jeremy Sinclair and began to work direct for clients. It was Sinclair's "Pregnant Man" ad for the Health Education Council which first set tongues wagging about the small agency. Charles' younger brother Maurice joined the business in 1970 after Cramer's departure whereupon it was renamed "Saatchi and Saatchi" and developed into a full-service advertising agency.

Noted work included their campaign "Labour isn't working" on behalf of the Conservative Party before the 1979 UK general election and ongoing campaigns for British Airways, and Silk Cut with whom the agency had long relationships. The agency was seen as producing breakthrough creative work with a bold attitude and employed people who went on to be stars of their industry including Sir John Hegarty, Lord Tim Bell and Sir Martin Sorrell.

A New Alliance

While the addition of Wendy's and JC Penney to the American client roster reaffirmed Roberts' belief in the 'ideas agency' model, the London office continued its slide as it plummeted out of the UK Top 10 list of agencies (a list, compiled by industry magazine Campaign UK, based on reported client billings). In early 2007, the London office saw the bulk of its work for Toyota UK and Europe leave to upstart agency CHI & Partners, just months after it had lost the entire Lexus business to the same agency. Late 2006 saw the return of some Toyota business, including the £60m pan-European launch of the Auris, Toyota's Corolla successor.

In July 2007, it was announced by Publicis chief Maurice Levy that Saatchi & Saatchi would form a new business alliance with sister agency Fallon. Fallon, part-owned by Publicis, has enjoyed similar mixed success with its network of offices. While its London office, with a client list that includes Sony, Orange and Asda, has been consistently lauded for its new business and creative success, its Minneapolis headquarters, where namesake founder Pat Fallon remains a presence, has been tarnished by a number of client losses, including Citigroup, BMW, Sony, Dyson and Starbucks.

The new alliance, known as Saatchi & Saatchi-Fallon (SSF Group), will operate under the supervision of Kevin Roberts, who was named as CEO of the new entity. Reporting to him is Robert Senior, one of the original partners of Fallon London, who will preside over the Europe & UK operations of the alliance, including both Saatchi and Fallon offices in London. In early 2008, Chris Foster, a Saatchi veteran of nearly a decade, was appointed to become the new CEO of Fallon's Minneapolis office, fuelling speculation that Fallon will become a new Procter & Gamble or General Mills roster agency.

After a year of operations, it was announced in October 2008 that the SSF Group had been contracted by chocolate giant Cadbury to handle its Dairy Milk and related brands across several markets (including the UK, Europe, Russia, Canada and the United States), with a reported total of $US200m in billings. Whilst Fallon London would lead creative efforts across Europe, Saatchi's New York office was handed the brief to handle the business in the United States, where Cadbury remains a relative unknown compared to its main competitor, Hershey.

Olay

Olay

Olay (known until 1999 as Oil of Olay in South Africa and North America, Oil of Ulay in the United Kingdom and Oil of Olaz in some European countries) is the top skin care retail brands in the world, except for Japan, and is one of Procter & Gamble's multi-billion dollar brands. For the 2009 fiscal year ended June 30, Olay accounted for an estimated $2.8 billion of P&G's $79 billion in revenue.

Early days

Olay originated in South Africa as Oil of Olay. Graham Wulff (1916-2008), an ex-Unilever chemist from Durban, started it in 1949. The name "Oil of Olay" was chosen by Wulff as a spin on the word "lanolin", a key ingredient.

It was unique in the early days because it was a pink fluid rather than a cream, packaged in a heavy glass bottle. Wulff and his marketing partner, Jack Lowe, a former copywriter, had tested the product on their wives and friends and were confident in its uniqueness and quality.

Olay's marketing was also unique, since it was never described as a moisturizer, nor even as beauty fluid. Nowhere on the packaging did it say what the product actually did. Print adverts used copy such as “Share the secret of a younger looking you” and talked about the ‘beauty secret’ of oil of Olay. Other adverts were written as personal messages to the reader from a fictitious advice columnist named Margaret Merril. They ran in Readers’ Digest and newspapers and often looked like editorials.

Wulff and Lowe, who ran the company under the banner of Adams National Industries (ANI), did not sell the product to the trade, but waited for pharmacies to ask for it based on consumer requests.

As the company began to market the product internationally, it was decided to modify the name of the product in each country so it would sound pleasing and realistic to consumers. This led to the introduction of Oil of Ulay (UK and Ireland), Oil of Ulan (Australia) and Oil of Olaz (France, Italy, the Netherlands and Germany). In 1970, ANI opened a test market in USA (Chicago), and was expanding into northern Germany.

Today

The Olay brand has expanded into a range of other products grouped in “boutiques” including Complete, Total Effects, Professional, Regenerist, Quench (North America), White Radiance (Asia) and Olay Vitamins (USA). Olay is the market leader in many countries including USA, UK, and China. Olay has extended its heritage as a moisturizer to stay looking young, to formally creating the “anti-aging” category in mass stores with the launch of Total Effects in 1999. The launch was almost double the typical price of a mass market moisturizer at the time. Today, there are numerous products in market more expensive than Olay.

Olay Regenerist was the best performing anti-aging cream in a 2006 test done by a consumer association. In August 2007, Olay was launched in India.

Olay’s current slogan is "Challenge what's possible", which was changed from "Love the skin you're in".

Since 2010, "Oil of OLAZ" is called only "OLAZ" in German-speaking countries. Slogan : "Olaz lässt sie strahlen. (lit: Olaz makes you shine)"